Spec-Net Building Index
Hillmont Braille Signs

Brass Braille from Hillmont Braille Signs Sydney

brass braille sign

Background of Brass

One of the principal industrial users of brass was the woolen trade, on which prosperity depended prior to the industrial revolution. In Shakespearean times, one company had a monopoly on the making of brass wire in England. This caused significant quantities to be smuggled in from mainland Europe. Later the pin trade became very important, about 15-20% of zinc was usual with low lead and tin to permit significant cold working to size. Because of its ease of manufacture, machining and corrosion resistance, brass also became the standard alloy from which were made all accurate instruments such as clocks, watches and navigational aids. The invention by Harrison of the chronometer in 1761 depended on the use of brass for the manufacture of an accurate timekeeper that won him a prize. This took much of the guesswork out of marine navigation and saved many lives. There are many examples of clocks from the 17th and 18th centuries still in good working order.

With the coming of the industrial revolution, the production of brass became even more important. In 1738, William Champion was able to take out a patent for the production of zinc by distillation from calamine and charcoal. Cast brass was hammered to make wrought plate in a water-powered 'battery'. Rods cut from the plate were then pulled through dies by hand to make the vital stock needed for pins for the textile weaving industry. Although the first rolling mills were installed in the 17th century, it was not until the mid-19th century that powerful rolling mills were generally introduced (*Internet source).



Hillmont Braille Signs Profile

02 9680 2151

28/8 Victoria Ave, Castle Hill, NSW, 2154

ENQUIRE HERE

ENQUIRE NOW

Video

Hillmont Braille Signs Profile

02 9680 2151

ENQUIRE HERE

ENQUIRE NOW

Video






Related News Articles